Preview

Russian Japanology Review

Advanced search

Commentaries and Commentary Modes in Japanese Literary Tradition Based on the Examples of the Classical Poetry Anthologies

https://doi.org/10.24412/2658-6444-2021-2-70-93

Full Text:

Abstract

Classical studies were the mainstream of Far Eastern traditional culture. A survey of the relationship between classics and their commentaries is central for an understanding of the intellectual history of the countries of the Far East, of which Japan is one. Commentaries paid tribute to the canonization of literary monuments but did this without regard for the artistic and intellectual character of the classical text. Commentaries to the classical texts of ancient Japan, in particular, to the first poetic anthology Man’yōshū (“Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves”), are taking shape in the Heian era (9th-12th) as an attempt to restore the Japanese outlook on this poetry written in the 8th century in Japanese, but in Chinese characters. This classical poetry acquired a new form in the 9th century: now it was written in kanji and Japanese syllabary (hiragana). Several types of literary criticism existed: treatises on literary works, commentaries on classical monuments, compilation of anthologies (selection of literary texts for the constitution of complex collections), as well as poetic contests. Commentators mostly concentrated on understanding the meaning of separate words and phrases, but the general meaning of the text remained out of the scope of their attention.

About the Author

E. M. Diakonova
Institute for World Literature of Russian Academy of Sciences; HSE University
Russian Federation


References

1. Chou Yū-t’ung. (1983). Jing, jing-xue, jing-xue shi [Classical Books, Study of Classical Books, History of the Study of Classical Books], in Chou Yūt’ung, Jing-xue shi lun xuan ji [Selected Works by Chou Yū-t’ung About the History of Studying Classical Books], composed by Chu Weicheng. Shangai: Renming chu ban she. (In Chinese).

2. Dolin, A. A. (2001). Kokinwakasyu - gordost’ yaponskoi poezii [Kokin Wakashū - the Pride of Japanese Poetry]. In Kokinwakashū [Collection of Old and New Songs of Japan]. Translation from Old Japanese by A. A. Dolin. Saint Petersburg: Giperion. (In Russian).

3. Ermakova, L. M. (1995). Rechi bogov i pesni lyudei. Ritual’no-mifologicheskie korni yaponskoi literaturnoi estetiki [Words of Gods and Songs of People. Ritual and Mythological Roots of Japanese Literary Esthetics]. Moscow: “Oriental Literature”. (In Russian).

4. Golygina. K. I. (1971). Teoriya izyaschnoi slovesnosti v Kitaye [Theory of Literature in China]. Moscow: Oriental literature. (In Russian).

5. Goreglyad, V. N. (1997). Yaponskaya literatura VIII-XVI vv.: nachalo i razvitie traditsii. [Japanese Literature of the 8th-16th cc.: The Beginning and Development of the Tradition]. Saint Petersburg: “Saint Petersburg Oriental Studies” Center. (In Russian).

6. Henderson, J. B. (1991). Scripture, Canon and Commentary. A Comparison of Confucian and Western Exegesis. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Hiraoka, T. (1946). Keisho no seiritsu [The Creation of Classics]. Osaka: Zenkoku shobo. (In Japanese).

7. Honda, S. (1975). Chūgoku Keigaku-shi [History of the Study of Chinese Classics]. Taipei: Gu-zin shu-I. (In Japanese).

8. Kokinshū [A collection of Poems Ancient and Modern]. [2004]. Translated and annotated by L. R. Rodd & M. C. Henkenius. Boston: Cheng & Tsui Company.

9. Kokinwakashū [Collection of Old and New Songs of Japan]. (2001). Translation from Old Japanese by A. A. Dolin. Saint Petersburg: Giperion. (In Russian).

10. Man’yōshū [Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves]. (1957-1962). In series: Nihon koten bungaku taikei [Full Edition of Classical Japanese Literature]. Vols. 1-4. Tokyo: Iwanami Shoten. (In Japanese).

11. Man’yōshū [Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves]. (1965). The Nippon Gakujutsu Shinkōkai Translation. With a New Foreword by Donald Keene. New York: Columbia University Press.

12. Man’yōshū [Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves]. (1971). Translation, introduction, comments A. Ye. Gluskina. Vol. 1. Moscow: Chief Publishing House of Oriental Literature. (In Russian).

13. Man’yōshū [Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves]. (1990-1997). In series: Shinpen Nihon koten bungaku zenshū [Full Newest Edition of Classical Japanese Literature]. Vols. 6-9. Tokyo: Shōgakukan. (In Japanese).

14. Ong, R. K. (1988) Image and meaning: The Hermeneutics of Tradiational Chinese Dream Interpretetion. In Brown C. T. & Lanham, Md. (eds.)

15. Psycho-Sinology: The Universe of Dreams in Chinese culture: University Press of America.

16. Smirnov, I. S. (2014). Kitaiskaya poeziya v issledovaniyakh, zametkakh, perevodakh, tolkovaniyakh [Chinese Poetry in Research, Records, Translations, and Interpretations]. Moscow: RGGU Publishing House.

17. Wang Yang-ming. Ch”uan-hsi lu [Instructions for Practical Living]. (1971). Taipei: Shang-wu yin-shu-kuan.


Review

For citations:


Diakonova E.M. Commentaries and Commentary Modes in Japanese Literary Tradition Based on the Examples of the Classical Poetry Anthologies. Russian Japanology Review. 2021;4(2):70-93. https://doi.org/10.24412/2658-6444-2021-2-70-93

Views: 69


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.


ISSN 2658-6444 (Print)
ISSN 2658-6789 (Online)